Kyuss - ...And the Circus Leaves Town CD (Reissue/Import)

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Tracklisting:

  1. Hurricane
  2. One Inch Man
  3. Thee Ol' Boozeroony
  4. Gloria Lewis
  5. Phototropic
  6. El Rodeo
  7. Jumbo Blimp Jumbo
  8. Tangy Zizzle
  9. Size Queen
  10. Catamaran
  11. Spaceship Landing

“And The Circus Leaves Town” is the final Kyuss album to be released before their breakup. Although the band is now back together again, it no longer has all of the original members, most notably Josh Homme and Nick Oliveri. Both critics and fans alike seem to harbor mixed feelings on this album, including myself. It still has that classic Kyussformula added it to it. The stoner rock sludgy guitars that are down tuned 2 whole steps. The focus on a deep and layered rolling bass that shares the slot with the guitars. And of course, how could you forget John Garcia’s vocals, for better or for worse. It’s unfortunate that this album seems to be not necessarily rushed, but lacking. What makes it unfortunate is because it has outstanding production quality for a Kyuss album. I mean take a listen to their earlier records, and it sounds like it was recorded on a tape player. Then again, that lo-fi quality is what Kyuss made sound ahead of its time in the first place.

“And The Circus Leaves Town” contains 11 songs. For the most part the songs are pretty average to short in length. There only happens to be 3 songs that break the 5 minute barrier. One of those 3 songs happens to be over 34 minutes in length, but is rather a combination of 3 songs, and most of it just has silence as a filler. If they removed the filler space, the actual track would probably be about 13 or 14 minutes in length. For me it seems like for every good song on this album, there is a bad song. A yin yang effect to say the least. I mean, it’s not that bad to have 5 good songs on an album, but I feel Kyuss is capable of more.

The only single that appears on this album is “One Inch Man”. In being a single, it does happen to be a good track. It is pretty trippy and actually focuses on making a rather unique guitar riff by just playing one guitar note. After a few measures, the drums and bass follow suit and kick in. The cool thing about this is that the guitar appears on the left speaker while the rest of the band kicks in on the right side. It could very well be the exact opposite though, I’m not sure if my speakers are set up correctly. Nevertheless it’s a rather cool effect. The guitar keeps that rather repetitive beat, however it does vary every other bar or so, keeping the song from feeling stale. The guitar solo is actually really cool, it has this nice abstract echo feel to it while Homme plays a series of hammer ons and pull offs. This is by far one of the better songs on the album.

Although it’s not a official single, I feel that “El Rodeo” should have been. It appears as the 6th track on the album and is by far in the top 3 best songs on the album. I feel the other 2 are probably “One Inch Man” and “Spaceship Landing”. Now the first thing you will notice on “El Rodeo” is it’s very distinct guitar part. In fact, it pretty much hammers the same riff into ...

your head for nearly half of the song before finally changing. It has a very clean tone that feels like it is only using the “rhythm” pickups on a guitar, if you know what I mean by that. It has a very Hispanic feel to it, like a Mariachi should be playing it. Now while the guitar is playing that dainty little riff, the rips in and they coincide perfectly. Speaking of which, a second guitar plays to an extent to the opposite of the first, and in a sense fills in the empty spots. I very much enjoy the first half of the song, however the second half kind of gets boring. It just plays this highly repetitive power chord riff while Garcia’s obnoxious voice screams the same line over and over again.

“Spaceship Landing” happens to be the last track on the album. This is also the track that is comprised of 3 songs and is in fact 34:04 in length. The track begins with a drum beat that plays for a few measures until the guitar and bass kick in. This song unlike most Kyuss songs, wastes no time at all in getting to business. Where most of their songs seem to play out for a few minutes before getting into the vocals, Garcia is on track within like the first 30 seconds of the song. The guitar and bass pretty much follow each others lead for the verse of the song, until it gets into the chorus. Garcia’s voice is actually very tolerable on this song and actually adds some character to it. The chorus slows down and plays a bit more mellow, and the guitar begins to differentiate itself and plays a nice jam, that is expected of Kyuss. Other than the 2 instrumentals on this album, this song seems like to be the only real jam song on “And The Circus Leaves Town”. Being that this is song includes 3 songs in one, the next “song” is called “M’deea”. I put song in quotations because this happens to be about a 14 second track that just has some simple drum beat playing while someone sings some line with made up words or something obscure. The last track is called “Day One” and appears at 32:31 of the song. This track has a simple bass and guitar chord progression, and plays until the end of the song. “Day One” is in fact a dedication to both Dave Grohl and Krist Novoselic after Kurt Cobain suicide.

Kyuss had a lot of potential at the time, it’s just unfortunate to seem them fall flat with this one. “And The Circus Leaves Town” I feel had potential. There are a few songs that really stand out, but it seems for every good song, there is a bland song to weigh down it’s merits. It’s really like a rollercoaster with its ups and downs. I think the only people who would really like this album in particular are prior Kyuss fans or people who like Queens of the Stone Age. Then again, these are in fact the only audience that have ever came in contact with this album. I don’t know man, if you want to introduce someone to Kyuss, there are better albums than this to start with. - BodgieCrunch (ReviewStream.com)

more mellow, and the guitar begins to differentiate itself and plays a nice jam, that is expected of Kyuss. Other than the 2 instrumentals on this album, this song seems like to be the only real jam song on “And The Circus Leaves Town”. Being that this is song includes 3 songs in one, the next “song” is called “M’deea”. I put song in quotations because this happens to be about a 14 second track that just has some simple drum beat playing while someone sings some line with made up words or something obscure. The last track is called “Day One” and appears at 32:31 of the song. This track has a simple bass and guitar chord progression, and plays until the end of the song. “Day One” is in fact a dedication to both Dave Grohl and Krist Novoselic after Kurt Cobain suicide.

Kyuss had a lot of potential at the time, it’s just unfortunate to seem them fall flat with this one. “And The Circus Leaves Town” I feel had potential. There are a few songs that really stand out, but it seems for every good song, there is a bland song to weigh down it’s merits. It’s really like a rollercoaster with its ups and downs. I think the only people who would really like this album in particular are prior Kyuss fans or people who like Queens of the Stone Age. Then again, these are in fact the only audience that have ever came in contact with this album. I don’t know man, if you want to introduce someone to Kyuss, there are better albums than this to start with. - BodgieCrunch (ReviewStream.com)

https://www.reviewstream.com/reviews/?p=158708